April 22nd, 2010
05:05 PM ET

Stone, Parker respond to 'South Park' controversy

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CNN Entertainment/"Showbiz Tonight" received the following statement from Anne Garefino, Executive Producer of “South Park," about the controversy over the bleeping of their show:

On behalf of Matt Stone and Trey Parker, Creators of “South Park”: Regarding Comedy Central’s decision to bleep portions of Wednesday night’s episode:

"In the 14 years we've been doing 'South Park' we have never done a show that we couldn't stand behind. We delivered our version of the show to Comedy Central and they made a determination to alter the episode. It wasn't some meta-joke on our part. Comedy Central added the bleeps. In fact, Kyle's customary final speech was about intimidation and fear. It didn't mention Muhammad at all but it got bleeped too. We'll be back next week with a whole new show about something completely different and we'll see what happens to it."

As we noted in an earlier blog entry, on Wednesday, the conclusion of the two-part story involving the Prophet Mohammed was shown with a number of audio spots covered by bleeps and images hidden by a block reading "CENSORED."

"Comedy Central was responsible for the bleeps and not showing Mohammed in last night’s episode," a spokesperson for the network told CNN.

The April 14 episode had attracted protest from an Islamic group, Revolution Muslim. The group posted an entry on its website that included a warning to Parker and Stone.

April 22nd, 2010
12:19 PM ET

'South Park' gets modified by Comedy Central

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"South Park" often gets bleeped. But not usually like this.

On Wednesday, the conclusion of the two-part story involving the Prophet Mohammed was shown with a number of audio spots covered by bleeps and images hidden by a block reading "CENSORED." Though "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone have had fun with censorship in the past - including in part one of the Mohammed story, which involved free speech issues - apparently this time much of the censorship came from Comedy Central itself.

"Comedy Central was responsible for the bleeps and not showing Mohammed in last night’s episode," a spokesperson for the network told CNN.

The first part of the episode, which aired April 14, attracted protest from an Islamic group, Revolution Muslim. The group posted an entry on its website that included a warning to Parker and Stone that they risked violent retribution after the episode included a satirical discussion about whether an image of the prophet could be shown.

Abu Talhah al Amrikee, the author of the post, told CNN it was meant to show those offended by the depiction of Mohammed how they can voice their opposition, and wasn't a call to violence.

Mohammed was believed to have been portrayed disguised in a bear suit in a portion of the episode, though last night's episode revealed otherwise.

On Stone and Parker's website, SouthParkStudios.com, a message acknowledged that Comedy Central had added some bleeps and that they couldn't stream their cut of part two:

"After we delivered the show, and prior to broadcast, Comedy Central placed numerous additional audio bleeps throughout the episode," said a message on the site. "We do not have network approval to stream our original version of the show."

April 22nd, 2010
12:18 PM ET

CBS mourns loss of executive

The man who helped make CBS “America’s Most Watched Network" has died.

The network confirmed to CNN that Ron Scalera, executive vice president and creative director of the CBS Marketing Group, died suddenly on Wednesday in Los Angeles.  He was 49.

Scalera was credited with helping to make the network successful through his creation of branding and launch campaigns for many of CBS’ top series, including the "CSI" franchise, "NCIS," "The Big Bang Theory," "The Good Wife" and, most recently, "Undercover Boss."

FULL POST


Filed under: television
April 22nd, 2010
12:12 PM ET

Jamie Oliver: What you should have in your kitchen

In case you've been trapped under a truckload of frozen chicken nuggets for the past few weeks, here's the recap:

Celebrity chef and self-proclaimed "professional s***-stirrer" Jamie Oliver came to Huntington, West Virginia - considered by various metrics (obesity, toothlessness and heart disease rates, among others) to be the unhealthiest city in America - with co-producer Ryan Seacrest and a camera crew in tow. His goal: recreate his successful U.K. campaign to overhaul school lunch menus, teach families how to cook healthier (or even just cook) at home and make the residents keenly aware that many of them just might be paving the way to an early grave with processed, overly fatty food.

Did he succeed? You'll have to tune in to the season finale on Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution on Friday night, but we caught up with the erstwhile Naked Chef to get the inside dish on the aftermath of his Huntington visit, the element of balance and what every home cook should have stashed in the cupboard. The following is an edited version of that interview: FULL POST

April 22nd, 2010
09:00 AM ET

'Top Chef Masters' recap: Return of the chefs

The third episode of "Top Chef Masters" brought back six losers from last season. It just so happens that, like all of the “cheftestants” on the show, these losers are culinary legends who run some of the best restaurants in the country.

What happens when you take a sextet of larger-than-life chefs bringing their A-plus games on a mission to redeem themselves? You get macho posturing, mouth-watering dishes, and total, unmitigated failure.

You also get a Frenchman who curses at reality stars, Irish cuisine and his fellow colleagues. FULL POST

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Filed under: Top Chef
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